red tulips | copyright Jill J. Jensen

 

 

99.3 Random Acts of Marketing

Drew McLellan
Des Moines, Iowa: Innova Training & Consulting ©2003


Bite-sized business tips in a regular-sized package. What a deal! Written by the owner of an ad agency in the central United States, Random Acts serves as both a reminder of what you may already know about marketing your products, services, or organization, and a gently humorous nudge to get busy about putting that knowledge to use. Whether we like it or not, in our 24/7 constant-contact world, all business owners and employees are de facto marketers for the places they work, the clients they hold in relationship, and the products and services they provide.

Totally new ideas may be few and far between, but, as McLellan points out, success often comes by doing the obvious and the mundane consistently and regularly. He quotes facts and figures — also an appropriate thing to do in marketing materials that cry for specificity instead of glittering generalities — and he mixes in anecdotes, bullet points, and references to other useful resources.

More than once, we are treated to the admonition to think of our audience(s) instead of ourselves when developing marketing materials and approaches. Just because we've seen the ad or heard the story a hundred/thousand times doesn't mean our potential customers have encountered it at all.

"According to a study by Thomas Publishing Company," states McLellan, "most marketers give up too early. The study reveals 80% of sales to businesses are made on or after the fifth contact, but only 10% of all marketing efforts go beyond three times!

"When planning your marketing efforts, remember that frequency is critical to success. You have to get your customers' attention, pique their interest and create the need for your product or service. Then, you have to stay under their nose until they are ready to buy. No single ad or direct mail piece can be expected to accomplish all that in a couple of attempts."

The book is set up in an interesting format: all the information nuggets are on the right-hand pages. All the left-hand pages are blank, with the heading "Random notes:" — leaving plenty of space for you to doodle your own ideas and applications.

Random Acts is an easy read, but don't let that fool you. You'll learn everything from how using the two-letter U.S. state abbreviations can save you money on your direct mail projects to the value of thinking about marketing campaigns, not just brochures. Like the adage about the irresistibility of potato chips or chocolate chip cookies, take one taste of these Random Acts and you'll stick around for the whole book.

 

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